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Daniel Martínez-Quintanilla Pérez 6:01, Peru

A visual trance that goes through the daily odyssey of the ‘chaucheros’ (longshoremen) of the Port of Masusa in the Amazon. This dock where dozens of ships that supply Iquitos, the largest city in the world without land connection. A continuous movement through which the resources of the jungle are also bled to the mainland. These men make titanic efforts to survive under the sun. Without wheels or cranes to relieve the weight on their backs of more than 120kg, submerged in a noisy shipwreck of more than 400 years of exploitation.

Daniel Martínez-Quintanilla (Alicante-Spain, 1986) is a natural born seeker. As a witness and storyteller of remote stories that are far from our sight, between journalism and documentary, Daniel has managed to spread his footage all over the world, through film festivals and international media such as HBO or the Associated Press. He proposes to invest in new creative methodologies, providing spaces for audiovisual creation based on the ordinary aspects of life and the urgent need for recording and broadcasting first-person testimonies of cultural heritage and native people’s struggles. He was born in Spain by chance and has been living in Peru for a long time. Having always one foot in the jungle and the other one in the streets of anywhere, he has worked for important entities such as Amnesty International, Red Cross, UNICEF or the IOM ‘Artivist’, in a never-ending battle against his identity and his social commitment that pushes him to take part of social movements and feel part of them. The need to grow creatively brought him to the cinema, from empirical experiences and visceral emotions, a field in which he tries to boost small changes to build a better (a more human) world, a world of greater justice and solidarity.